Monthly Archives: July 2012

2013 AALL Annual Meeting Survey

AALL’s Annual Meeting Programming Committee is surveying members about programming for the 2013 annual meeting in Seattle. If you’d like to contribute, you can find the survey at: http://www.cvent.com/d/5cq1kd

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ALL-SIS Programs for AALL 2012 in Boston

AALL WORKSHOPS

W-2: Workshop for Newer Academic Law Library Directors
Date, Time, & Room: Saturday, July 21, 2012, 8:00 a.m. – 5:00 p.m., Hynes Convention Center (HCC) Room 204
Program Track: Library Management and Administration
Target Audience: Academic law library directors with seven or fewer years of experience as a director
This workshop will assist law library directors, with seven or fewer years of experience as directors, to serve as effective leaders in regard to the personnel, communication, budgetary, and management issues that commonly arise in academic environments. The program also will help participants develop strategies to foster productive relationships with other institutional administrators (including deans); integrate the law library fully into the curricular and scholarly life of the law school; communicate with all critical constituencies; and lead a library during times of institutional evolution and economic constraints. Through the program sessions and structured opportunities to engage one-on-one with experienced law library directors, participants will receive knowledge and guidance in regard to designing a professional growth plan; developing a scholarly agenda; and engaging in an appropriate range and balance of professional activities. The workshop will also provide participants with knowledge and strategies related to responding to the many challenges that commonly face directors, including workload, institutional relationships, and ethical dilemmas.

W-3: Legal Research Teaching Academy ** THIS WORKSHOP IS FULL**
Date, Time, & Room: Saturday, July 21, 2012, 8:00 a.m. – 5:00 p.m., OFFSITE-Harvard Law School, Wasserstein Hall (Room 3018)
Program Track: Teaching
Target Audience: Librarians who teach their own legal research course
Experienced teachers will lead interactive sessions on learning styles, course and class design, creating the right classroom environment, lecturing well (including using class discussion effectively), designing and executing in-class activities, assessment of students, the role of technology in teaching, and ongoing improvement of teaching skills and style. Over the lunch break, each speaker will lead a roundtable on a teaching topic suggested by participants. Pre-workshop readings and activities will be assigned. Because the sessions build on content presented throughout the day, participants should plan on attending the entire workshop.

 

AALL PROGRAMS

A-5: Be Memorable: Library Advocacy through Compelling Storytelling
Date, Time, & Room: Sunday, July 22, 2012, 10:45 – 11:45 a.m., Hynes Convention Center (HCC) Room 312
Program Track: Library Management and Administration
Target Audience: All librarians who are interested in developing strong advocacy skills
Whether persuading an administrator within your institution or lobbying for external action, storytelling can be a powerful and compelling advocacy tool. Telling stories about real people and real challenges is an effective means for convincing others of your viewpoint. What makes a good story? How can you incorporate the elements of storytelling into your advocacy efforts? After learning the fundamentals of a persuasive story and how to successfully integrate the story within a strategic advocacy campaign, participants will have the opportunity to practice their newly acquired skills in small groups. Volunteers from the small groups will share their story drafts with the larger audience and receive constructive feedback.

B-4: Piercing the Veil of Sovereignty: The Sources of International Human Rights Law: Part I
Date, Time, & Room: Sunday, July 22, 2012, 1:15 – 2:45 p.m., Hynes Convention Center (HCC) Room 312
Program Track: Reference; Research and Client Services
Target Audience: Academic, government, and court reference and collection development librarians
Part I of this program will teach participants the advanced skills they need to research difficult problems in the United Nations Charter-based and treaty-based bodies. Presenters will use examples of violations of human rights law and the institutional responses to them to illuminate the characteristics of the treaties; the enigmatic organization and procedures of the institutions created by the Charter and the treaties; and the unique documents produced by those institutions. Participants will return to their institutions able to solve research problems that they could not have previously addressed.

C-4: Piercing the Veil of Sovereignty: The Sources of International Human Rights Law: Part II
Date, Time, & Room: Sunday, July 22, 2012, 3:45 – 5:00 p.m., Hynes Convention Center (HCC) Room 304
Program Track: Reference; Research and Client Services
Target Audience: Academic, government, and court reference and collection development librarians
Part II of this program will teach participants the advanced skills they need to do research on difficult problems in the Council of Europe, the European Court of Human Rights, and the Inter-American Human Rights Commission and Court. Presenters will use examples of violations of human rights law and the institutional responses to them to illuminate the characteristics of the European and American Human Rights agreements; the enigmatic organization and procedures of the institutions created by the those treaties; and the unique documents that they produce. Upon returning to their institutions, participants will be able to solve research problems that they could not have previously addressed.

D-5: Law Library Research Assistant Programs: Two Different Models
Date, Time, & Room: Monday, July 23, 2012, 8:30 – 9:45 a.m., Hynes Convention Center (HCC) Room 210
Program Track: Library Management and Administration
Target Audience: Library directors in academic law libraries; public services librarians who teach or provide faculty services
A law library research assistant (RA) program can enhance a library‘s value and market librarian skills within the institution, while expanding the teaching role of librarians. A library RA program promotes faculty recruitment and retention by providing skilled and accountable research assistants to law faculty. Two predominant models of library RA programs exist in U.S. law schools, and administrators of these programs get many inquiries from other academic librarians who are interested in starting their own programs. Law librarians representing the two models will explain the distinctions among their programs and the factors that make their models successful.

E-2: Engaging and Educating the Screen Addicts of 2012
Date, Time, & Room: Monday, July 23, 2012, 10:45 – 11:45 a.m., Hynes Convention Center (HCC) Room 302
Program Track: Teaching
Target Audience: Librarians looking for ways to enhance their digital presence among patrons, especially through the use of custom-made instructional modules and digital media
This program will explore the depth of student engagement with digital media, specifically how to manage and deal with information-complacent patrons through new methods of engagement within instructional materials. Two librarians will share their case studies of how they incorporated digital media tools into their instructional materials in an effort to engage today‘s tech-savvy patrons, and will also inspire participants to incorporate digital media into their own instructional materials and library guides by showcasing an exemplary librarian-created product, Lawbore, (http://lawbore.net/) and its sister site Learnmore (http://learnmore.lawbore.net/). The speakers will then provide participants with ideas and tips on how the average librarian with limited resources and IT knowledge can create his or her own digital media-enhanced products using tools such as LibGuides.

G-3: The Best of Both Worlds: Blending Online and Face-to-Face Learning in Teaching Legal Research
Date, Time, & Room: Monday, July 23, 2012, 2:45 – 4:00 p.m., Hynes Convention Center (HCC) Room 304
Program Track: Teaching
Target Audience: Academic librarians who teach legal research
ABA Rule 306 has permitted law schools to offer distance education classes for some time, and students increasingly enjoy the greater convenience of online courses. Legal research classes are emerging as key areas of potential innovation for law schools testing out online and blended courses. Librarians have a unique opportunity to take the lead in pioneering new ways of teaching in this new learning environment. Panelists will draw on their own experience of creating and teaching conventional, online, and blended legal research classes to review what has worked and what hasn‘t. This session will include discussion of webinars, online course management systems, in-person sessions, and integrated learning techniques which actively involve students in mastering the concepts of legal research

H-3: You CAN Handle the Truth: Using Pop Culture to Teach Legal Research
Date, Time, & Room: Tuesday, July 24, 2012, 8:30 – 9:45 a.m., Hynes Convention Center (HCC) Room 304
Program Track: Teaching
Target Audience: Legal research teachers, whether beginning, advanced, or subject-specific
“I’m Just a Bill.” Marcia Clark being schooled during the OJ trial for not Shepardizing. Pop culture is full of examples of legal research, but the value such examples actually add to our lessons is rarely assessed. The program speakers will begin with a discussion of the pedagogical support for using culturally familiar characters and settings in the classroom, and then provide examples and demonstrate best practices for prepping and integrating video clips, songs, comics, and other pop culture references into a legal research lesson. These best practices include selection of references familiar to the audience and use of technology to prepare and deliver the lessons. The speakers will also discuss their experiences using pop culture and how to avoid potential risks when implementing this technique in the classroom. Lastly, this session will also address how using pop culture and humor can humanize teachers to students, encourage student participation in what many see as a “boring” class, and foster collaboration among instructors.

I-4: Pruning the Collection, Growing Services: What’s New in YOUR Library?
Date, Time, & Room: Tuesday, July 24, 2012, 10:15 – 11:45 a.m., Hynes Convention Center (HCC) Room 304
Program Track: Reference; Research and Client Services
Target Audience: Librarians interested in discovering new collection management techniques and developing innovative client services
The twin pressures of budget restrictions and increasing demand for services have inspired many creative responses from law librarians. Librarians will benefit from sharing their best practices and experiences with each other. This session will use the “fishbowl technique” to engage audience members in a discussion of innovative practices being implemented at their own libraries. The moderators will facilitate an ongoing conversation among 4-6 rotating participants from the audience and encourage questions from the audience, as well.

J-1: Asking Hard Questions: Teaching Through Questions and Controversy
Date, Time, & Room: Tuesday, July 24, 2012, 2:30 – 3:15 p.m., Hynes Convention Center (HCC) Room 302
Program Track: Teaching
Target Audience: Librarians who teach, whether the instruction is in the form of a library workshop, bibliographic instruction, or a for-credit legal research course.
The hardest questions don‘t always have easy answers. Legal research instructors need to ask hard questions—covering content, assessing student understanding, and moving instruction forward. Bloom‘s Taxonomy provides a basis for instructors to consider as they develop questions for their students. The speakers in this program will describe effective questioning strategies in light of Bloom‘s Taxonomy and demonstrate how to ask effective questions. Audience members will participate in a brief discussion of high-interest—and often controversial—subjects and how to use them to raise student interest when teaching.

K-3: Passing the Baton: Option or Obligation?
Date, Time, & Room: Tuesday, July 24, 2012, 3:45 – 4:45 p.m., Hynes Convention Center (HCC) Room 304
Program Track: Library Management and Administration
Target Audience: Librarians who need to be aware of succession planning in their departments
As the professional and paraprofessional librarian population ages, new members must be recruited, hired, and trained to manage and continue to develop our public and technical services departments and operations. Staff may be retiring, or absent from work for extended periods due to maternity, medical, military, and other leave needs. Regardless of job titles or how jobs may have changed over the years, this program will focus on concerns, issues, and implementation plans as staff retires or takes extended leave and “passes the baton” to newer members of the law library community. How do you recruit and train replacements? How do you seamlessly return to work after an extended absence? What historical information do you impart about institutions and departments so that the library can continue to be responsive to its ever-changing patron community? Program speakers will address technology tools and communications necessary for smoothly managing succession to accommodate retirements and/or planned extended absences. The program will conclude with an interactive discussion among presenters and attendees.

 

ALL-SIS SPONSORED INDEPENDENT PROGRAMS

A Teachable Moment: The Relevance of Results Using Digests and Citators in Westlaw and Lexis
Date, Time, & Room: Monday, July 23, 2012, 8:30 – 9:00 a.m., Hynes Convention Center (HCC) Room 206
Program Track: Teaching
Target Audience: Teachers of legal research
This program will discuss empirical research into the differences in the results obtained from database searches using primarily intermediated systems (West’s headnotes and key numbers) or primarily computer-generated systems (Lexis’s Topics and More Like This Headnote). The program will also examine the search results from using Shepard’s and Keycite, where each system utilizes a different algorithm. The visible difference in results can be used to illustrate how variable search results are in different databases. Recommended teaching methods for using this data to assist students in understanding the benefits and limitations of computer-assisted and human-assisted searches will be shared.

Diversify Your Teaching Portfolio with Tutorials!
Date, Time, & Room: Monday, July 23, 2012, 1:15 – 2:15 p.m., Hynes Convention Center (HCC) Room 207
Program Track: Teaching
Target Audience: Librarians charged with developing and teaching legal information literacy to users: students, attorneys, and public patrons
Today‘s challenges of teaching legal information literacy include limited face time with users, demanding millennials who want more than lectures, and the introduction of new and changing research interfaces. Creating web-based tutorials is one way to address these challenges while, simultaneously diversifying your teaching portfolio. Tutorials can be instructional, reinforcing, and/or assessment-focused. Discover the components of three types of tutorials and the best practices for ensuring your tutorials are tailored to the learning needs of your particular audience. Also learn about the various free and proprietary software
options for creating tutorials. To assist in the tutorial production process, participants will be provided with tips and cautions, templates and samples, sources for multimedia content, and a selected bibliography of sources about creating and utilizing tutorials.

Riding Solo: Legal Research Competencies for the Solo Practitioner
Date, Time, & Room: Tuesday, July 24, 2012, 8:30 – 9:45 a.m., Hynes Convention Center (HCC) Room 206
Program Track: Teaching
Target Audience: All librarians involved in legal research instruction
The number of law school graduates who start solo practices has grown substantially in recent years. For the law school class of 2008, NALP reported that 3.3 percent of these graduates were working as solo practitioners. For the class of 2010, that number soared to 5.7 percent of reporting graduates. With increasing numbers of law students entering solo practice, legal research instruction must address economically realistic options for conducting comprehensive legal research. This program will address the trends of students entering solo practice, and law librarian panelists will discuss how these changes influence legal research instruction at their institutions. In addition, panelists will present ideas and examples of lesson plans focused on introducing students to research without the use of expensive legal research databases.

2012 ALL-SIS Awards

The ALL-SIS Awards Committee is pleased to announce the winners of this year’s Outstanding Article Award, Active Member Stimulus Grant, Regular Member Stimulus Grant, and CONELL Grants:

Outstanding Article Award: Aliza B. Kaplan and Kathleen Darvil are the winners of the Outstanding Article Award for Think [and Practice] Like a Lawyer: Legal Research for the New Millennials, 8 Leg. Comm. & Rhetoric 153 (2011). Aliza B. Kaplan is an Associate Professor of Legal Analysis & Writing at Lewis & Clark Law School. Prof. Kaplan received her B.A. from George Washington University and her J.D. from Northeastern University School of Law. In addition to teaching Legal Analysis & Writing, Prof. Kaplan teaches a seminar in Public Interest Lawyering, regularly consults on wrongful convictions cases, and represents asylum seekers. Kathleen Darvil is an Access Services–Reference Librarian and Adjunct Assistant Professor of Law at Brooklyn Law School. Ms. Darvil received her A.B. and M.S.I from the University of Michigan and her J.D. from Fordham University. In addition to serving on the reference team, she supervises the Library’s circulation operations, teaches Advanced Legal Resource courses, and serves as Library liaison to the Moot Court Honor Society.

Active Member Stimulus Grant: The Active Member Stimulus Grant in the amount of $1000 has been granted to Sara Sampson. Sara has been an active member of ALL-SIS since 2004. She served as a member of the Faculty Services Committee and in the following year served as the Chair. In 2006 she became a member of the ALL-SIS Programs Committee and then served as the Chair in 2007. She served as Treasurer of ALL-SIS from 2009-2011 and after completing her term on the Executive Board, served as the Chair of the ALL-SIS Archives and Website Committee. She currently serves as the Chair of the ALL-SIS Programs committee. She is currently working at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill as Deputy Director of the Katherine R. Everett Law Library. She is also a Clinical Professor of Law.

Regular Member Stimulus Grant: Michelle Cosby is the winner of the Regular Member Stimulus Grant and will receive $1000 to help defer the cost of the conference this year. She has worked as a reference librarian since 2006 and is currently the Senior Reference and Instructional Services Librarian at North Carolina Central University School of Law. She has been a member of the Community Service Committee, Continuing Status Committee, Publications Committee and is currently Vice Chair of the Committee on Relations with Information Vendors, and Chair of the New Products Award Subcommittee.

CONELL Grants: Kelly M. Leong and Jennifer Martin Rice are the winners of the CONELL Grant this year and each will receive $500 for the purposes of attending CONELL. Kelly graduated from Law School in May of 2008 from George Washington University Law School and completed her Masters degree in May of 2011 from The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. She is currently working as a Reference Librarian at the Goodson Law Library of Duke University School of Law. Jennifer received her J.D. from Salmon P. Chase College of Law in May of 2010 and will graduate with a M.S. in Library Science from the University of Kentucky this summer. She currently serves as the Interim Assistant Director for Collection Development at the Salmon P. Chase College of Law Library. Both Kelly and Jennifer have agreed to become members of the New Academic Law Librarians Meeting (NALLM)/Mentoring Committee and will write an article for the ALL-SIS Newsletter about their experience at CONELL.

Congratulations to all the winners!!